Car Repair

10567 106 St NW Edmonton AB T5H 2X5 Tel: 780 425 9132

Services

Center Auto Repair is your one-stop vehicle maintenance and repair...

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Car Care Tips

How much do you really know about your car? Here are some surprising facts...

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Maintenance

Regular vehicle maintenance reduces break downs and prolongs the life of your car...

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CAR CARE TIPS

Steps For a Winter Ready Car

The last thing any driver needs is to break down in cold, harsh winter weather. A vehicle check now before winter arrives is a sensible way to be car care aware and avoid the inconvenience of being stranded out in the cold and with the unexpected expense of emergency repairs,

Winterizing your vehicle before the temperatures drop is a wise idea, “An investment of an hour or two to have your vehicle checked is all it takes to have peace of mind and help avoid the cost and hassle of car trouble during severe weather.”

The following are the steps for winterizing your vehicle:

  • If you’re due for a tune-up, have it done before winter sets in. Winter magnifies existing problems such as pings, hard starts, sluggish performance or rough idling.
  • Have the battery and charging system checked for optimum performance. Cold weather is hard on batteries.
  • Clean, flush and put new antifreeze in the cooling system. As a general rule of thumb, this should be done every two years. 
  • Make sure heaters, defrosters and wipers work properly. Consider winter wiper blades and use cold weather washer fluid. As a general rule, wiper blades should be replaced every six months.
  • Check the tire tread depth and tire pressure. If snow and ice are a problem in your area, consider special tires designed to grip slick roads. During winter, tire pressure should be checked weekly.
  • Have the brakes checked. The braking system is the vehicle’s most important safety item.
  • Have the exhaust system checked for carbon monoxide leaks, which can be especially dangerous during cold weather driving when windows are closed.
  • Check to see that exterior and interior lights work and headlights are properly aimed.
  • Be diligent about changing the oil and filter at recommended intervals. Dirty oil can spell trouble in winter. Consider changing to “winter weight” oil if you live in a cold climate. Have your technician check the fuel, air and transmission filters at the same time.

Motorists should also keep the gas tank at least half full at all times to decrease the chances of moisture forming in the gas lines and possibly freezing. Drivers should check the tire pressure of the spare in the trunk and stock an emergency kit with an ice scraper and snowbrush, jumper cables, flashlight, flares, blanket, extra clothes, candles/matches, bottled water, dry food snacks and needed medication.

 

How much do you really know about your car?
Here are some surprising facts about these machines that we depend on every day:

  • Four out of five vehicles on the road need maintenance right NOW!
  • On average, motorists spend over $6,000 annually on vehicle related costs!
  • The computer system on today's average car performs more tasks than the computers on the Apollo spacecraft!
  • Full battery power at 80 degrees drops to 65% at freezing and only 40% when the temperature hits zero!

Car Care Tip of the Day

SUMMER

  • Make sure you check your tire pressure regularly (including the spare) — at least once per month and before every long trip — and keep it at the level recommended by the vehicle manufacturer.
  • The correct cold inflation pressure for your tires is listed on the vehicle label on the door post, fuel door, glove box or in the owners' manual. "Cold inflation pressure" refers to the pressure in a tire that has not been driven for at least three hours. As tires warm during driving, it is normal for pressure to build up. Never reduce air pressure when tires are hot.
  • The tire pressure listed on your sidewalls is the maximum pressure and is not intended to serve as notification of the correct pressure.
  • Under inflation creates excessive stress and heat, and may lead to tire failure. It is also important to guard against over inflation, which can cause uneven wear, plus handling and stopping problems.
  • Vehicles equipped with Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) can help motorists detect loss of inflation pressure. Federal regulations require TPMS to warn drivers when tires are 25% under inflated. For many vehicles this warning may be too late to prevent damage caused by under inflation. TPMS units are NOT a replacement for monthly tire pressure checks with a gauge.